A Personal Story: Tongue-Tied and Breastfeeding

A Personal Story: Tongue-Tied and Breastfeeding

I recently had my third son this past summer and was looking forward to breastfeeding him just like I breastfed my other two sons. Having had wonderful breastfeeding experiences with my other two boys, I was quite surprised when I experienced pain while breastfeeding with this baby. I knew that the latch looked right from the outside, but something was not right if there was pain.

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Breastfeeding...On My Heart, In My Soul...Through My Eyes

Breastfeeding...On My Heart, In My Soul...Through My Eyes

Beads of sweat forming on her forehead and tears streaming down her face, a sweet momma looks up at me briefly in between long, loving gazes at her newborn.  No words were necessary as her face wore the expression of gratitude and elation.  We sit in silence for a moment listening to the rhythmic thup, thup, thup of that sweet baby at the breast.  I stroke baby’s soft, little head, careful not to disturb the latch that took so long to achieve.  Inside, my heart is floating, and relief floods my soul…

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Round Two: 10 Tips for Nursing Your Newborn While Chasing a Toddler

Round Two:  10 Tips for Nursing Your Newborn While Chasing a Toddler

"Breastfeeding the second time around was SO much easier. Probably because I had the confidence. I breastfed my first for 2 years, so I 'knew' I could do it again. I just felt way more comfortable, and I knew the early pain was normal and would get better in a few days. It's been tough because my toddler still needs attention, but the baby needs to eat! So we're working on it and figuring it out together. But overall, it has been way easier and more comfortable the second time around."   Beth, pictured above

 

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    Lactation Derailment Can Begin in the Hospital: 10 Tips for Avoiding a Trainwreck

    Lactation Derailment Can Begin in the Hospital:  10 Tips for Avoiding a Trainwreck

    I must preface this blog by explaining that fourteen years ago I became a mother/baby nurse, and ten years ago I became the resident childbirth educator and "breastfeeding counselor" on staff at a local hospital.  We did not have an IBCLC on staff, so I was IT until we hired another educator.  My training as a nurse, some time as a member of La Leche League and my own personal breastfeeding experience was all I had in my arsenal. 

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    A "Time" To Celebrate

    A "Time" To Celebrate

    I didn't need to read the article featured on the cover of Time magazine to predict the tone of the piece, and it was obvious that the intent of the photo accompanying the article was to ruffle feathers not encourage educated, non-judgmental discussion.  Fact is, how you feed your baby and for how long is a personal decision. As mothers, we should have the freedom to parent our children without fear of judgement.

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    A BABE Mom's Story: 6 Tips For 6 Months

    A BABE Mom's Story: 6 Tips For 6 Months

    Three weeks into her breastfeeding journey we had the privilege of meeting this sweet momma and her precious little boy.  Our first contact was November 15, 2011.  She was our fifth client but our first real challenging case.  Over the phone, she described that she was having some pain and nipple damage with latch and decided it was time to get help as she suspected what she was experiencing was not normal.  This was her third baby to breastfeed yet the first time to experience this situation.

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    More Than Meets the Eye: How Doulas Help Moms Breastfeed

    More Than Meets the Eye: How Doulas Help Moms Breastfeed

    As lactation consultants, we are thrilled to work along side our local Houston area doulas.  It is well-supported by research that labor and birth interventions can interfere with the natural course of breastfeeding, and it is also well-supported by research that the incidence of birth complications is reduced by having a doula present at your birth.  However, a doula is more than just "present" at your birth, patting your hand through contractions.

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    What Are You Afraid Of?

    What Are You Afraid Of?

    In January, our families had the opportunity to spend New Year's Day together at a beautiful house located on about 40 acres of land.  Behind the house, the yard sloped down into a small pond, low from the dry year we had.  The ground was covered with pine needles and crunchy leaves...beautiful landscape but tough for little feet to navigate through.

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    Before You Breastfeed: 10 Tips for New Breastfeeding Moms

    Before You Breastfeed: 10 Tips for New Breastfeeding Moms

    1. Learn about and use Laid-back breastfeeding technique. This approach taps into your baby's feeding instincts. Your baby is capable of latching and feeding well at the breast.

    2. Have a list of things others can do to help you when they come to visit. If visitors must come in the early weeks have a list posted on the refrigerator of small tasks that YOU would find helpful and reduce your stress. Usually someone else holding the baby is not as helpful as someone running a load of laundry or fixing a meal or changing the sheets on your bed. Don't be afraid to ask for help; your job is to spend time with your baby learning about her, feeding her and resting.

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    Does My Baby Have Oral Motor Hypotonia?

    Does My Baby Have Oral Motor Hypotonia?

    I never thought a speech pathologist would be in my circle of breastfeeding support, but just a few days after the birth of my first son, we were referred to one. At our first appointment with the speech pathologist, Ellen Carlin, we discovered through thorough hands-on testing that our son had oral motor hypotonia, a condition of weakened muscles of the mouth. We were quite surprised when our second son was born a few years later and had the same latch difficulties, so we headed back to Ellen Carlin and received the same diagnosis.

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    When to Call a Lactation Consultant (IBCLC)

    When to Call a Lactation Consultant (IBCLC)

    Breastfeeding should be an enjoyable experience for mom and baby! Although breastfeeding is natural, many factors play into the ease to which mom and baby learn and adapt to these new skills. Lactation Consultants are trained medical professionals who can evaluate the source of your breastfeeding challenges and offer ways to improve the outcome for both you and your baby. Below is a list of common issues lactation consultants can assist with.

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