A "Time" To Celebrate

Molly at 24 months

Molly at 24 months

I didn't need to read the article featured on the cover of Time magazine to predict the tone of the piece, and it was obvious that the intent of the photo accompanying the article was to ruffle feathers not encourage educated, non-judgmental discussion.  Fact is, how you feed your baby and for how long is a personal decision. As mothers, we should have the freedom to parent our children without fear of judgement.  Any woman who takes hold of the responsibility to ensure the health and well-being of her children is

"mom enough."

Bay Area Breastfeeding and Education supports breastfeeding as the biological norm, and we would love to see exclusive breastfeeding rates at 6 months increase (currently only 14.8%)...

  • Katherine Dettwyler's anthropological research shows that the minimum predicted age for natural weaning is 2.5 to 7 years.
  • The World Health Organization recommends exclusive breastfeeding for the first 6 months of life, then to 2 years or beyond.
  • Here in the United States, the American Academy of Pediatrics "reaffirms its recommendation of exclusive breastfeeding for about 6 months, followed by continued breastfeeding as complementary foods are introduced, with continuation of breastfeeding for 1 year or longer as mutually desired by mother and infant."

...However, though our goal is more moms breastfeeding and more babies receiving breastmilk, we support moms where they are and work to help them reach their goals.  The mom is the mom...we are not; the baby is hers...not ours; the baby has to eat...it's mom's decision not ours.  We educate, we practice using the evidence, we encourage breastfeeding, we support with compassion, we foster empowerment.

  • The mom who breastfeeds is mom enough.
  • The mom who formula feeds is mom enough.
  • The mom who home schools is mom enough.
  • The mom who has her kids in public school is mom enough.
  • The mom with one child is mom enough.
  • The mom with five kids is mom enough.
  • The mom who wears her babies is mom enough,
  • and the mom who doesn't is mom enough.